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The Timekeeper Chronicles

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First Words in Borelian

Since the last post could feel overwhelming with all the rules and such, I decided that this post would be a little easier and more along the lines of "first words" that you can use to impress your friends, I guess.

Numbers (Ul Nis)

0 - Da
1 - Tev
2 - Si
3 - Wol
4 - Bar
5 - Bri

Colors (Ul Ekra) - Human Perspective

You can cast some ambiguity on the nature of an adjective with use of "-iza" roughly meaning "-ish."  Therefore, "briniza" can be translated to "orange-ish."

Black - Xid
Pink - Ves
Red - Oji
Orange - Brin
Yellow - Emen

Colors (Ul Ekra) - Borelian Perspective

Ith
Od
Nit
Thar
Urlo
Wi

Basic Words

Plurality for nouns is denoted in several ways.  First, by context.  Second, by use of specific numerals.  Third, non-specific nine ("ul").  Fourth, some archaic plural forms still survive (these words will be marked).

Boy, Man - Wedo
Girl, Woman - Dari
Sister - Olib
Brother - Alib
Village, Small City - Brid
House, Dwelling - Baosik
Big - Mith
Small - Enil
Fast - Rathad
Slow - Blath

Victory - Zik (pl. Zika)
Adult - Jenthi (pl. Jenith [Ancrath only])

Pronouns

Borelian pronouns are notoriously complex and oddly specific.  The following list is a beginning, basic list that is the most straightforward and one-to-one with their English counterparts.

I - Ru
You (Sing. Intimate) - Vi
You (Sing. Casual) - Mi
You (Sing. Formal) - Za
He/She - Um*
It - Ti*
Non-Specific - Je

*When Borelians speak to each other, "um" is reserved only for Borelians, and "ti" is used for all other species.

Misc. Words

And - Ja
The - In

 

In the next post, we'll go over simple, equative sentences.

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